Michael Colunga (16 Nov 2010)
"RE: Enoch and Hanukkah"

 
Hello, John and Doves,
 
Enoch!  Ah!
 
It would be just like the Jesus portrayed by Jim Caviezel in the film, The Passion of the Christ,
to call the festivals of lights, the "hidden day."  What irony!!  What fun!!
 
Your letter recalls to mind Romans 8:30--
    "And having chosen them, he called them to come to him. And he gave them right standing with himself, and he promised
        them his glory."  Romans 8:30, NLT
 
In HaShem,
Mike C.
Lisa Taylor (15 Nov 2010)
"Enoch and Hanukkah"



Dear Doves,

      The name Enoch means "dedicated."  It is derived from the same Hebrew root used for the name Hanukkah – also known as the Feast of Dedication. 

      Enoch was translated to heaven because of his faith: 

"By faith Enoch was taken from this life, so that he did not experience death; he could not be found, because God had taken him away.  For before he was taken, he was commended as one who pleased God.  And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him."  Hebrews 11:5-6. 

"Enoch walked with God; then he was no more, because God took him away."  Genesis 5:24.

     His translation is viewed as a type for the Rapture.  Is it possible then that his name provides a clue as to the timing of the Rapture?

     In John 10:22, we see Jesus at the Temple walking in Solomon's Colonnade on the Feast of Dedication.  This was also the future meeting place of the early Church:

"And all the believers used to meet together in Solomon's Colonnade."  Acts 5:12.

     It is during Hanukkah that Jesus tells the Jews that His sheep listen to His voice:

"My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me.  I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand.  My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father's hand.  I and the Father are one."  John 10:27-30.

     Please notice that the Greek word used in this passage for "snatch" is "harpazo."  The very word we use to describe the Rapture today.

     When we think of Hanukkah, we think of the menorah.  But did you know that the menorah is also the symbol for the Church?  When the Apostle John was called to heaven in Revelation 1, he hears someone speaking in a loud voice, like a trumpet.  See Revelation 1:10.  He sees Jesus walking among the lampstands.  And he is told what the lampstands represent:

"The mystery of the seven stars that you saw in my right hand and of the seven golden lampstands is this: The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches, and the seven lampstands are the seven churches."  Revelation 1:20.    

     The lampstand is a piece of furniture found in the Tabernacle, and then the Temple.  So, we can infer that John was translated into the heavenly Temple.  And to bring things full circle, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Temple.

     Now, I do not know if we will hear His voice at Hanukkah.  I do not know if He will walk among us – the people who represent His lampstands – on the holiday that celebrates the miracle of the menorah.  But it does seem like a wonderful time for all of us to exercise an Enoch-like faith.

     "Now faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see."  Hebrews 11:1.

     "For the grace of God that brings salvation has appeared to all men.  It teaches us to say 'No" to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope – the glorious appearing of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us to redeem us from all wickedness and to purify for himself a people that are his very own, eager to do what is good."  Titus 2:11-14.

     Do not lose your hope.  Maranatha!

                                                     – Lisa Taylor