Jim Goodrick (25 May 2011)
"Thank you Jan + "Trees" ( J Kilmer )"

Thank you Jan for finding that wonderful poem.
http://www.fivedoves.com/letters/may2011/jan524.htm

It has meant so much to me. And like I told Susan B and Lisa yesterday, I made the mistake of looking for it under GM Hopkins. Poems like this help me to "keep my eyes focused on Jesus ", in these trying times.

Since a rose is not always around, I use the red numbers on the digital clock to remind me of His blood covering
throughout the day. Colors, the beauty in nature, kindness etc. all help to distract from the "pull" of this world.

The last sentence says " His cross in every tree" and it reminds me of the famous poem by Joyce Kilmer. I've added that as well. I see from the dates that both J Kilmer and JM Plunkett lived at the same time.

Thank you Jan, Lisa and Susan B for loving these poems. They truly are medicine for the soul.

In Him,
Jim Goodrick


342. I see His Blood upon the Rose
By Joseph Mary Plunkett  (1887–1916)

I see his blood upon the rose
And in the stars the glory of his eyes,
His body gleams amid eternal snows,
His tears fall from the skies.
 
I see his face in every flower;         5
The thunder and the singing of the birds
Are but his voice—and carven by his power
Rocks are his written words.
 
All pathways by his feet are worn,
His strong heart stirs the ever-beating sea,        10
His crown of thorns is twined with every thorn,
His cross is every tree.

http://www.bartleby.com/236/342.html
_________________________________________________

Joyce Kilmer. 1886–1918

119. Trees
 
I think that I shall never see  
A poem as lovely as a tree.  
  
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest  
Against the sweet earth's flowing breast;  
  
A tree that looks at God all day,          5
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;  
  
A tree that may in summer wear  
A nest of robins in her hair;  
  
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;  
Who intimately lives with rain.   10
  
Poems are made by fools like me,  
But only God can make a tree.
 http://www.bartleby.com/104/119.html