Gino (4 Mar 2018)
"questions about the riders on the four horses"


I had a few questions about the riders on the four horses in Revelation 6:

Revelation 6:2 And I saw, and behold a white horse: and he that sat on him had a bow; and a crown was given unto him: and he went forth conquering, and to conquer.

Why do some Christians believe that the rider on the white horse is Jesus, while others believe it is the beast, the antichrist?
Those are two completely opposite teachings, how can that be?

Revelation 6:4 And there went out another horse that was red: and power was given to him that sat thereon to take peace from the earth, and that they should kill one another: and there was given unto him a great sword.

Why do so many say that the rider on the red horse brings war?
Doesn't it say that he has power to take peace from the earth, rather than power to make war?
He doesn't start any wars himself, does he?
Rather, he has power to take peace from the earth.
That, in itself, is not an act of war, is it?
However, when peace is taken from the earth, violence follows, correct?
It also says that they should kill one another, but can that not also mean individual violence, like in Genesis 6?
The result can be wars of an entire nation against another nation, but isn't this at least resulting in man killing man?

Revelation 6:5 And when he had opened the third seal, I heard the third beast say, Come and see. And I beheld, and lo a black horse; and he that sat on him had a pair of balances in his hand.
 6 And I heard a voice in the midst of the four beasts say, A measure of wheat for a penny, and three measures of barley for a penny; and see thou hurt not the oil and the wine.

The rider on the third horse has a pair of balances in his hand, does that indicate something relative to commerce?
Then there is a voice in the midst of the four beasts, is that the voice of the four beasts, or is it the voice of the LORD in their midst?
It says, "A measure of wheat for a penny, and three measures of barley for a penny".
Why do most people "go to the Greek" on this?
Why do they say that the people in John's day understood this better than anyone else?
This didn't happen in their day, but will happen in a future time.
Why wouldn't the people who will experience this, understand this far better than the people in John's day?
Why would it be best understood in terms of a first century denarius?
Rather than in the terms of the people who will go through it?
Why go to the Greek, instead of to the scriptures?
In going to the scriptures, do we not see that something very similar was said before?

II Kings 7:1 ∂ Then Elisha said, Hear ye the word of the LORD; Thus saith the LORD, To morrow about this time shall a measure of fine flour be sold for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria.

There had been a famine, and the cost for even terrible things to eat, were outrageous.
But then, as the LORD prophesied through Elisha, flour and barely would be sold for next to nothing.
The spoil of the army of the Syrians was abandoned, and the prices for food, collapsed through the floor.
So, why cannot it be similar for the rider on the black horse?
Why, in that case does it mean a days wages for the wheat and barley?
And not rather a repeat of what happened in the days of Elisha?
In Elisha's day, it wasn't a days wages for a measure of wheat or barely, but rather:

II Kings 6:25 And there was a great famine in Samaria: and, behold, they besieged it, until an assís head was sold for fourscore pieces of silver, and the fourth part of a cab of doveís dung for five pieces of silver.

That was a whole lot more than a day's wages, and not for a measure of wheat or barley, but for what would normally not even be eaten.
So why use such similar words in Revelation 6, if it wasn't to remind people of II Kings 6 & 7?

Revelation 6:8 And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.

Isn't the rider on the fourth horse named, Death?
It says Hell followed with him - what does that mean?
Then when it says that power was given to them, is the "them", Death and Hell, or is it not rather the four horsemen?
The sword would refer to the rider on the second horse, which would answer my question, above, that he does have power to kill.
The hunger would refer to the rider on the third horse, where the is first a terrible famine, like in Elisha's day.
Death would refer to the rider on the fourth horse.
That would leave, "beasts of the earth", to refer to the rider on the first horse.
Could, "beasts of the earth", also point to the two beasts in Revelation 13, sometimes called the antichrist and false prophet?
If so, then, wouldn't that show the rider on the first horse to be the antichrist, rather than Jesus?