Brian Barker (23 Jan 2014)
"Prophecy of Rabbi Judah Ben Samuel"


We are closer than what we think

 

The Eight-Hundred-Year-Old Prophecy of Rabbi Judah Ben Samuel

Will the years immediately following 2016 be prophetically important for Israel and the world? Earlier we noted when seventy years (a biblical generation) is added to 1948—the year Israel was formally recognized as an independent nation by the United Nations—it brings us through the year 2018. Does this mean the year 2019—exactly seven years after 2012—would mark the year that Jesus Christ returns with the armies of heaven to establish His rule over Earth? According to an eight-hundred-year-old prophecy, it certainly could. Before he died of cancer, J. R. Church analyzed the ancient predictions of Rabbi Judah Ben Samuel and noted:

Ludwig Schneider, writing for Israel Today (March 2008) said, “Some 800 years ago in Germany, Rabbi Judah Ben Samuel was a top Talmudic scholar with an inclination for the mystical. Before he died in the year 1217, he prophesied that the Ottoman Turks would conquer Jerusalem and rule the Holy City for ‘eight Jubilee Years.’” A biblical Jubilee year consists of 50 years. Fifty multiplied by eight equals 400 years.

Afterwards, according to Ben Samuel, the Ottomans would be driven out of Jerusalem, which would remain a no-man’s land for one Jubilee year. In the tenth Jubilee year [2017]…the Messianic end times would begin.…

Looking back at Ben Samuel’s prediction, we should note that the Ottoman Empire did conquer Jerusalem in 1517, exactly 300 years after the rabbi’s death, and was defeated 400 years later in 1917.

In Israel Today, Ludwig Schneider continues, “This came to pass 300 years after Ben Samuel’s death. He could not have based this prophecy on events that could be foreseen, but only on the results of his study of the Bible.

According to Leviticus 25, the nation is reunited with its land in the year of Jubilee. Therefore, the Jubilee year plays an important role in Israel’s history. In this case, the Jubilee began with the defeat and conquest of the Mamelukes in Jerusalem by the Ottoman Kingdom in 1517. The Turks reigned over Jerusalem until the British General Edmund Allenby defeated them exactly eight Jubilees later in 1917.

“Ben Samuel’s prophecy was fulfilled precisely because 1517 to 1917 is exactly 400 years. Afterward, Jerusalem was a no-man’s land for 50 years during the time of the British Mandate (1917–1967) and the time of Jordanian rule (1947–1967), another Jubilee year. During the Six Day War in 1967, Israel captured Jerusalem from Jordan and the city returned to the Jewish people after nearly two millennia of exile. After that, the countdown for the Messianic age began.”

Schneider assumes that since Rabbi Judah Ben Samuel’s prediction appears to be fulfilled to date, then 2017 should launch the beginning of the Messianic era.[iii]

2012 and Matthew 24

Is it possible that Jesus marked the year 2012 as the start of the final age? When His disciples asked, “Tell us, when shall these things be? And what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world [aion]?” (Matthew 24:3), Jesus answered, “as the Days of Noe [Noah] were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be” (Matthew 24:37).

The word aion in this text is not the general word for “time” (chronos) in Greek. Aion is the word the Greeks used to designate an actual cycle of the Milky Way alignments or the span of an age. Before he passed away, David Flynn emailed me to say: “The answer Jesus provided His apostles for ‘when’ the end of the aion would occur was specific. The astronomical signs in the heavens would be just as those during the days of Noah when Leviathan encircled the horizon in the dawn of the Summer solstice. There could have been no more accurate comparison made between our present time than the age of Noah.… The present aion is coming to a close. Like the sunteleia before, there will be great upheaval and change.”[iv]

 

Obama, like Mandela is an antichrist of the end times

Even the conventional inaugural prayers, which have been historically offered during U.S. presidential installation ceremonies, carried an unparalleled New Age flavour this time around. Rick Warren, considered America’s Christian pastor, rendered a blessing in the name of the Muslim version of Jesus (Isa), while the bishop of New Hampshire, Gene Robinson, invoked the “God of our many understandings.”

The conscious effort by Obama to reorient America away from conventional Christianity was widely embraced by people who identified with the man known to sport Masonic emblems, a ring that says “There Is No God Except Allah,” and a tiny idol of the Hindu god Hanuman in his pocket—whose blessings he sought in the race to the White House—a deity about whom Rudyard Kipling wrote the short story “The Mark of the Beast.”

For Obama, who grew up in a household where the Bible, the Koran, and the Bhagvat Gita sat on a shelf side by side, organized religion was best defined as “closed-mindedness dressed in the garb of piety,” but a useful political tool nonetheless. And so he used it masterfully, and earned a cult following while doing so.

By February 2009, Obama had replaced Jesus Christ as America’s number-one hero according to a Harris poll, and dedication to his come-one, come-all mysticism has continued to spread in esoteric circles, with evangelists of the new religion calling for the “tired” faith of our fathers to be replaced with a global new one.

Although it is more difficult to understand the broad appeal of Obama’s New Age philosophy to the many evangelical and Catholic voters who supported him, the phenomenon can be explained to some degree as the result of a changing culture. Over the past fifty years, and especially as baby boomers listened attentively to pastors telling them to focus on human potential and the “god within us all,” eastern philosophies of monism, pantheism, Hinduism, and self-realization grew, providing Americans with an alluring opportunity to throw off the “outdated ideas” of fundamental Christianity and to espouse a more “enlightened,” monistic worldview (all is one).

Aimed at accomplishing what the builders of the Tower of Babel failed to do (unify the masses of the world under a single religious umbrella), God was viewed as pantheistic, and humans were finally understood to be divine members of the whole “that God is.” Pagans argue this principle of inner divinity is older than Christianity, which is true. The gospel according to such New Age concepts—a gospel of “becoming god”—is as old as the fall of man. It began when the serpent said to the woman “ye shall be as gods” (Genesis 3:5), and it will zenith during the reign of the anti-Christian god-king.

“To contemplate ways to assist Barack in his 2012 re-election bid something miraculous happened,” she writes. “I felt God’s (His) Spirit beckoning me in my dreams at night. Listening, cautiously, I learned that Jesus walked the earth to create a more civilized society, Martin (Luther King) walked the earth to create a more justified society, but, Apostle Barack, the name he was called in my dreams, would walk the earth to create a more equalized society…” [xxii] We could continue, pointing to such examples as Michael D’ Antuono’s painting “The Truth,” featuring Obama wearing a crown of thorns with his arms stretched out as if on a cross, Democratic National Convention prayer garments with the president’s name and a calendar declaring him “heaven sent” (with the month of November depicting the president with people’s hands on his back and the phrase “The Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not want”) and photographs of Obama with the Bible verse from John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” A month after the election, Obama messianism continued as people across the globe celebrated Christmas with nativity scenes hosting figurines of Obama as the prophesied King of kings. This could go on and on, but you probably get the point. Much of the the world is ready now, even hungry for the arrival of the Man of Sin.

Conversely, this is where contrasting social feedback becomes equally interesting especially as a Public Policy Poll released in April 2013 reveals that one in four Americans now think Obama may actually be the Antichrist.

 

 

Oh, how easy it will be for the coming world leader, the antichrist, people worshipped Obama as “Christ returned.”  Christians voted in mass for Obama, how true the words of Jesus, “will I find faith when I return?”