Daniel Matson (24 Jan 2012)
"The Time of Jacob's Troubles"

January 24, 2012 – Daniel Matson
After completing the article on the Patriarchs, the next day turned out to be the 70th anniversary of the Wannsee Conference. On January 20, 1942 the German Powers launched the formal plan of logistics to the Final Solution, that is, the mass murder of God’s people. However, as has been documented here, the initial stages began with the election of Adolf Hitler in 1933 and the passing of the first anti-Semitic laws on Passover itself, which was April 11, 1933. Another start point of the Holocaust that is commonly cited is Kristallnacht, which occurred November 9-10, 1938. Indeed, this is when the Holocaust accelerated from law to action.
Thinking on such things brought back to mind Jeff Exner’s contribution that the Holocaust was a seven year period with the coming persecution in the 70th Week, the second set of seven years as pictured by Jacob’s two periods to obtain each wife. The analogy is quite startling since Isaac (the Son) and Rebekah (the Church) avoid this whole time of trouble, since Abraham (the Father) ensured that such a thing would not happen by sending Eleazar (the Helper, Holy Spirit) to get and bring back the bride. However, Jacob goes alone to the far country and thereby gets into trouble and must serve one period of seven years for each of his brides. Jacob wanted Rachel, but the custom was that the older must be married off first and so Jacob was tricked on his wedding night to find himself awake the next morning with Leah instead. His real goal then would require another seven years, which he did.
The interesting issue with two periods of seven years would then mean that the Holocaust was not a period unforeseen in the Bible, if it was indeed seven years. So is there some way to see if there might be more confirmation to these seven years? While looking through the timeline of the Holocaust there was another date that stood out above the rest. With the many laws being passed by Hitler to squeeze the Jews out of German society from 1933 to 1938, 25 percent of German Jews had immigrated and were causing a refugee problem for the world. This then led to the date of concern on the timeline.
On July 6-15, 1938, a League of Nations Conference was convened by the U.S. in Evian, France. Delegates from 32 countries attended to see how these nations could assist Jews fleeing Hitler. So which countries decided to help? None. And at that, it gave the Germans a green light to go further, as no nation would step up to the challenge. Here in the U.S. the concern was the Depression and lack of jobs that would be competed for by the Jews. Is it any wonder then why the world would soon face World War II?
Let us then consider the dates of this conference in Evian, France. The last day of the meeting was July 15, 1938, which corresponded to the 16th to 17th of Tammuz, since the 17th begins at dusk. The 17th of Tammuz is a day of mourning for the Jews to commemorate Moses breaking the tablets at Sinai, the ceasing of the daily offerings due to Nebuchadnezzar’s siege, and the breaching of Jerusalem’s walls by the Romans in 70 AD. It was also at this time that war broke in Israel during the Lebanon War of 2006 and it was also this date that corresponded to July 4, 1776 and the Declaration of Independence. In any regard, this date of July 15, 1938 goes down as the day the nations of the world turned their backs on the Jewish people.
If we then start from this date of July 15, 1938 and advance 2,520 days, the time would run out on June 7, 1945. Other than June 7th being 22 years prior to the taking of Jerusalem by Israel in the Six-Day-War in 1967, there is no other significance here. However, one month prior on May 8, 1945, Germany surrendered to end the Holocaust. But what is also interesting is that May 8, 1945 corresponded to Iyar 25 on the Hebrew Calendar. Under the observed calendar, this is day 40 in the count of the Omer. But if the counting of the Omer starts on the day after the Sabbath Day, as with Jesus’ resurrection on the 17th of Nisan, then Iyar 25 would have been day 39 in the count and Christ’s Ascension would have been the next day. Thirty-nine was of course the maximum number of lashings one could receive to avoid forty. With this period ending just before Christ’s anniversary day of Ascending to Heaven, clearly we are to be like the believers in Acts who longed for His return. One might think these events would have awaken some out of their slumber. In any way, a definite period of trouble for Israel was over on May 8, 1945.
The day counts then from July 15, 1938 to May 8, 1945 was 2,490 days, which is 30 days short of seven 360-day years (2,520 days). Seven lunar years would equal 2,480 days. It would seem that this time does fit the separate periods of seven years of Jacob’s troubles. Of course, this is only based upon an analogy with the clear biblical teaching that the seven years of Daniel’s 70th Week are the years yet to come with more dire consequences for the whole world.
However, though those days will come, it does not mean that one has to be a casualty among them. For the non-believer, there is still time to believe that Jesus was the Messiah who did fit all of what the Bible had predicted. Belief in Christ and his sacrifice now will ensure deliverance as the Bride of Christ in the scenario depicted by Isaac and Rebekah. Those who are part of the Bride of Christ will not go through the final period of seven years. Then there is a lesson to those who are part of that Bride, who are promised deliverance from the time to come. That is, it is also not time to be among those who do not watch for Christ’s return and end up aiding the enemy in the coming destruction. Those who watch, will warn others and ensure that they do not add to the coming confusion. As those who stood by and watched the last Holocaust unfold, let us not aid or help set up the next.
The Royal Hotel, Evian, France                                            The Villa at 56-58 Am GroBen Wannasee in a suburb of Berlin.